May 21 - June 6, 2012

 

Public health is concerned with what we, as a society, do collectively to assure the conditions in which people live can be healthy. Social work is concerned with how to use relationships to solve problems that impact community and individual health. This Summer Institute will focus on:

1. Moving People Past Ambivalence: The Motivational Interviewing Approach

2. Understanding Psychotropic Drugs for Helping Professionals

3. Shrinking Anxiety Disorders

4. The Ethics of Being a Social Worker: Understanding and Addressing Ethical Dilemmas

5. Substance Abuse: What is it? How can you treat it?

6. Understanding the Human Reaction to Disaster: Crisis Response Training

 

Each problem will be addressed in a workshop format that permits professionals and those interested in working with people and communities such as those in the field of social work to attend. Participants may attend one or more workshops. Additional workshops may be added at a later time. 

 

We invite participants who are (1) staff, faculty, and social work students and (2) social workers/collaborators/counterparts of Vietnamese American NGOs and other international and local NGOs. These workshops will be particularly relevant to those working with (i) disadvantaged, traumatized and/or handicapped children (in orphanages, children’s centers, youths at-risk & victims of trafficking), (ii) adults who have experienced human abuse and violence or are struggling with drug abuse problems.

 

Participants should have a bachelor degree in a social science related field. Three years of experience as a practicing social service worker will exempt the requirement of a degree. University students will be permitted to attend the Institute workshops on a space available basis after more qualified individuals are accepted.

 

These workshops will emphasize practical methods of working with people and solving problems. There is no registration fee for these workshops and priority will be given to participants from co-sponsoring universities and organizations. All organizations are responsible for the costs of transportation, meals and lodging associated with sending their staff/collaborators to the training.

 

Workshops are sponsored by An Giang University and West Virginia University with the generous co-sponsorship of the Pacific Links Foundation An Giang/Dong Thap Alliance for the Prevention of Trafficking (ADAPT) and the Southeast Asia Children’s Project. ADAPT. Partners also include the East Meets West Foundation and the International Children Assistance.

 

 

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

Workshop 1 (May 21-23)

Moving People Past Ambivalence: The Motivational Interviewing Approach

Presented by Neal Newfield, Ph.D. and Susan Newfield, Ph.D.

 

 

Often people feel stuck and have difficulty deciding to move past a problem to a solution. This workshop focuses on a research informed approach for moving individuals past their ambivalence to change to a decision to make changes in their life. Participants will be introduced to the theory and practice of motivational interviewing. Opportunities will be provided for participants to practice the skills presented and to discuss how this information would apply to their work in Viet Nam.

 

Workshop 2 (May 24-25)

Understanding Psychotropic Drugs for Helping Professionals

Presented by Thomas Chase, MA, PA-C and Susan Newfield, Ph.D.

 

Frequently individuals with psychological problems are placed on medication to aide in their recovery. This workshop will provide basic information on the psychopharmacology of the different medications used in treatment, their treatment effects and side effects, and the neuroanatomy and physiology of what the medications do. Opportunities will be provided for participants to discuss how this information would apply to their work in Viet Nam.

 

Workshop 3 (May 28-30)

Shrinking Anxiety Disorders

Presented by Jim Keim, MSW, Neal Newfield, Ph.D., and Susan Newfield, Ph.D, and Thomas Chase, MA, PA-C.

 

This workshop will explore the range of anxiety disorders and their treatments. The therapy of anxiety usually involves some combination of the following three tasks, which, as we will explore, are very closely related: 1. Thinking differently, 2. Doing and interacting differently, and 3. Changing the way our body responds to a stressor. This workshop will review a number of theories of anxiety and will explore several treatments. Participants will develop some familiarity with two therapies by practicing the techniques with each other. There will be opportunities for participants to discuss how this information would apply in Viet Nam.

 

Workshop 4 (May 31-June 1)

The Ethics of Being a Social Worker: Understanding and Addressing Ethical Dilemmas

Presented by Patricia Chase, Ed.D. Jim Keim, MSW, and Susan Newfield, Ph.D.

 

Social Workers frequently find themselves in difficult situations that require a thoughtful 2 ethical response in regards to the client. This workshop will examine ethical codes and how to formulate an ethical response. Social Work ethical standards will be examined as guidelines for making decisions and their role in shaping professional identity. Ethical dilemmas will be presented as way of practicing how to make ethical decisions in your role as a social worker. There will be opportunities for participants to discuss how this information applies in a Vietnamese cultural context and practice arena.

 

Workshop 5 (June 4-June 6)

Substance Abuse: What is it? How can you treat it?

Presented by Patricia Chase, Ed.D., Thomas Chase, MA, PA-C, and Susan Newfield, Ph.D.

 

This workshop will focus on a basic understanding of addiction and substance abuse Participants will learn how to identify and assess substance abuse. Treatment approaches will be investigated and theoretical concepts underlying the treatment will be examined. The impact of treatment on the families of addicts will be discussed along with the challenges that come with clients who present with an addiction problem. (Participants may select between this and workshop 5. Enrollment will be caped to that there is a balanced distribution between workshops.)

 

Workshop 6 (June 4-June 6)

Understanding the Human Reaction to Disaster: Crisis Response Training

Presented by Suzanne Anderson, MSW, Jim Keim, MSW, and Neal Newfield, Ph.D.

 

At different points in life most people experience some kind of unexpected crisis. At these times people experience a wide range of reactions and each person's response to crisis can different. This training will prepare and equip participants to understand the impact of crisis on the individual and community and to learn skills for supporting those affected by crisis to cope with their immediate and longer-term emotional reactions. (Participants may select between this and workshop 4. Enrollment will be caped to that there is a balanced distribution between workshops.)

 

Workshops will begin at 8:30 and generally end at 16:30 hours with a 90 minute noon break for lunch. 

 

SHORT BIOS OF TRAINERS

Suzanne M. Anderson, MSW, is a certified crisis responder/trainer with the National Organization for Victim Assistance. Suzanne has worked in the USA, Canada, Yugoslavia, Singapore, India, Thailand, Indonesia, China and Myanmar training and responding to industrial accidents, natural disasters, and terrorist and war trauma. Suzanne is a counselor at the SACAC Counseling Center in Singapore. Suzanne is currently working toward a Doctorate of Professional Studies at the University of Southern Queensland in Australia.

 

Patricia Chase, Ed.D. LCSW. Pat is a Clinical Assistant Professor at West Virginia University. Her Doctorate is in Educational Psychology and she has a Master of Social Work. Pat has twenty years of experience in public sector social work practice, including direct practice, community organizing, supervision, administration, policy development, and in-service education. Her current areas of interest include vicarious trauma in social work practice, supervision and child welfare.

 

Thomas Chase. MA, PA‐C has a Master of Arts in counseling and is a Certified Physician Assistant with 30 years of experience working in the medical fields of psychiatry and neurosurgery. He holds an Advanced Certification of Psychiatry for Physician Assistants and has specialized in mental health for 25 years. Currently he works at the Louis A. Johnson Veterans Medical Center in a program for individuals who are experiencing post traumatic stress disorders.

 

James Keim, MSW, LCSW. James is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Social Work at West Virginia University and Director of the Southeast Asia Children’s Project, a group focused on the prevention of child trafficking and the treatment of its victims. He is co-author of the book, The Violence of Men, and a contributor to other texts on therapy with children and families.

 

Neal Newfield, PhD, LICSW. Neal is an Associate Professor of Social Work at West Virginia University and an Adjunct Associate Professor of Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry. He teaches courses in individual, marital and family therapy. Neal is a Clinical Member and Approved Supervisor for the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. His publications span a wide range of social work topics from research to practice.

 

Susan Newfield, RN, PhD, APRN, BC. Susan is an Associate Professor at the West Virginia University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing, Department of Health Restoration. She is also a family therapist and experienced in AIDS prevention work. Susan teaches courses in individual and family mental health care. She is a Clinical Member of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. Susan’s is a 4 coauthor of a commonly used text on nursing diagnosis.

 

Julian Nguyen, MSW has a specialization in gerontology and has worked for several organizations that serve the elderly, low-income clients and persons living with HIV/AIDS. Currently Julian is a senior adviser with the Undergraduate Student Advising Center at West Virginia University, organizing campus wide adviser training programs.

 

Nguyen Le Hoai Anh, MA of Sociology, is a lecturer at the Hanoi National University of Education where she has taught Sociology, Methodology of social researches, Gender and development, Social work with people living with HIV/AIDS, and Social work with drug users and sex workers.